Brandi Carlile: The Firewatcher’s Daughter (Album Review)

It’s here! And it’s magnificent! Brandi Carlile’s fifth studio album, The Firewatcher’s Daughter, was just released via ATO Records and it sure is somethin’ else. Recorded almost entirely as first takes without any demoing and little rehearsal, The Firewatcher’s Daughter is an unparalleled display of musical brillance.

We throw around the word “wail” so easily when it comes to big voices, but Brandi’s wail is a true, heart-in-throat keen so full of emotion it sounds on the verge of breaking yet so strong it deftly bends every note to her whim. And her longtime collaborators Tim and Phil Hanseroth (a.k.a. “The Twins.”) are with her every glorious step of the way.

“Wherever is Your Heart,” “Beginning to Feel the Years,” “Wilder (We’re Chained)” and the string-accented “I Belong to You” are the kind of beautiful ballads that would tug heartstrings no matter who sang them, but Brandi’s supernatural voice lifts them up to a celestial realm.

The album’s first single, “The Eye,” finds Brandi reigning in her extraordinarily big voice for gentler, sun-drenched, pop-folk harmonies.

“Things I Regret” is a deceptively uptempo, high energy road song that quickly builds, gaining momentum like a steam engine til the roaring finale.

Then “Mainstream Kid” throws a quaking, blues-rock stick of absolute dynamite on the tracks and blows the whole thing to hell. This woman can make Hendrix, Skynyrd, Ram Jam and Nirvana sound like soft jazz!

“Alibi” stays at full throttle rock level, but there’s an unexpected, subtle undercurrent of summery, California pop to the chorus melody that gives it a catchy and slightly disorienting swirl.

“The Stranger at My Door” is an intoxicating, mesmeric gulp of noir, a phantasmagoric masterpiece that bends the mind as much it does genre…like Johnny Cash fronting Led Zeppelin in a David Lynch movie then Trans-Siberian Orchetra jumps on stage to close with a freakin’ rock riff of “When Johnny Comes Marchin’ Home Again!” It is one of the greatest, most deliciously unusual songs ever constructed. Wow, just wow.

The album closes with a fitting cover of The Avett Brothers’ “Murder in the City.”

There is truly no one like Brandi Carlile at her fierce, brilliant best. She’s somehow simultaneously the heir to The Beatles, Janis Joplin and The Man in Black. I’ll be shocked if The Firewatcher’s Daughter isn’t my #1 album come December.

Buy @ Amazon

Brandi Carlile Official Site


The Vespers: Sisters & Brothers

The Vespers will release their third independent album, Sisters & Brothers, on February 10th. A “Southern Folk Pop Family Band” comprised of two sets of siblings, The Vespers sound like no one else. Their honeyed harmonies are layered over lush folk instrumentation with songs ranging from heartfelt and genteel to fierce and bombastic.



The standout tracks are the thunderous, dramatic opener “Break the Cycle” and the delicate exploration of faith in the modern age “Cynical Soul.”

Other highlights include “We Win,” “New Kids,” “Brothers & Sisters,” “The Curtain” and “Please.”

You can download a free, legal mp3 sample including tracks from the new album at Noisetrade.

Buy @ Amazon

The Vespers Official Site


D’Angelo: Black Messiah

Now this is an album. You see, once upon a time, instead of auto-tuned pop puppets churning out vapid radio singles, there were artists who took years, sometimes decades, to conceive, create, collaborate and masterfully hone their music-making craft before even stepping one tiptoe into a studio to record an album. That is why and how there is a Kind of Blue, a Tapestry, a Zoso, a Purple Rain, a Ten, The Archandroid and, now, a Black Messiah. D’Angelo has gifted the world with a work of Shakespearan proportions in an era of penny dreadfuls.



in a world where we all circle the fiery sun,
with a need for love, what have we become?
tragedy flows unbound and there’s no place to run


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Mary J. Blige: The London Sessions

Yes, it’s as good as everyone says it is. Mary J. Blige is one of the few true singers and her new album, The London Sessions, showcases her extraordinary voice in a variety of ways with a guest roster that includes Sam Smith and Disclosure.



There are plenty of slower, soulful songs like “Whole Damn Year” that put the spotlight directively on Mary’s gorgeous pipes and call to mind her classic hits “Not Gonna Cry” and “I’m Goin’ Down.” But there are also uptempo (and downtempo) tracks that experiment with electro-pop and a wide range of other genres – my favorites being the first single “Therapy” and Disclosure’s collaboration “Follow.” You can hear the whole album and watch videos below…

Buy @ Amazon

Mary J. Blige Official Site


Introducing Marie Davidson…

Sultry, dark, French electro-pop by Montreal singer-songwriter and poet Marie Davidson from her debut album, Perte d’identité (which means “loss of identity”)…

Buy @ Bandcamp

Buy Mp3s @ Amazon