Amanda Palmer: New Song “Small Hands, Small Heart”

Amanda Palmer once again called on her Patreon fans for songwriting inspiration, or, rather, participation. You can read about the project here. The page also shows pics of how Amanda transformed random words, phrases, and ideas she culled from her fans’ very diverse range of comments into a fully formed and recorded song in just three days. This one’s a bit more Dresden/Grand Theft Amanda, quiet yet peppy, calm but fierce.

You can download Amanda Palmer’s new song, “Small Hands, Small Heart,” at Bandcamp for $1 (or more if you wish).

100% of the song’s proceeds benefit Puerto Rico’s recovery from Hurricane Maria.


Amanda Palmer: New Song “Drowning in the Sound”

Amanda Palmer asked her Patreon community of fans for song inspirations, then wrote and recorded the resulting song in 2 days. The epic “Drowning in the Sound” moves from the eclipse to Hurricane Harvey. Amanda named Ani Difranco, Tori Amos, and Kate Bush as influences, but it’s also a continuation of her own evolving, mature sound–you can almost hear the path from The Dresden Dolls to “Machete.” You can read more of the song’s backstory and the lyrics here.

Amanda Palmer – Drowning In The Sound, by Amanda Palmer

Amanda Palmer – Drowning In The Sound by Amanda Palmer, released 31 August 2017

Download @ Bandcamp

Amanda Palmer & Edward Ka-Spel: I Can Spin a Rainbow (Album Review & Stream)

I’m so happy to hear my beloved Dresden Doll get all creepy and goth again! If, like me, you adore The Dresden Doll’s “Perfect Fit,” Amanda’s string-infused Bowie tribute, the Stranger Things theme, The Legendary Pink Dots (duh, it is Edward Ka-Spel after all), and Bauhaus, this is the album for you. If you don’t like them, well, I question your music taste and you should probably move on.


The standout track is “The Jack of Hands.” Other favorites are “Beyond the Beach,” “The Shock of Kontakt,” and “The Changing Room.”

The entire I Can Spin a Rainbow album is a delightfully eerie, spreading shadow.

Sonya Cotton: When I Go Home (Album Review & Exclusive Mp3)

No one so beautifully interprets heartache as Sonya Cotton. Her new album, When I Go Home, continues where her exquisite previous album, It is so, left off. Sonya’s lovely, otherworldly lilt narrates the loss of loved ones and nature over melancholy, multi-instrumental folk melodies in the classic, masterful way of Joni Mitchell and Joan Baez.



By the banks of the Yuba river
I received the dreaded call
that began the slow unwinding
of the life that I had known

From the mystery comes beauty
from the mystery comes strife
every moment at the mercy
of a force we cannot describe

The standout track is “Bloodroot.” Sonya says: “‘Bloodroot,’ in addition to being about a polar bear, is also about my mother’s losing fight with cancer. (As you may know, bloodroot is a plant that some claim can be used to pull tumors out of the body. Others believe there is no scientific/medical merit to this.) Though my mom never used Bloodroot, for me it was a symbol of the last strand of hope or last ditch effort in her battle with this illness.

That kind of metaphorical depth is a trademark of Sonya’s lyrics, particularly on this album and its predecessor. Every Sonya Cotton song is like a rich, poetic book.

Other highlights are “Yuba,” “Time Shows No Care,” “Don’t Want to Say Goodbye,” and “My Heart Lives,” but the entire album is truly, extraordinarily beautiful.

Sonya was kind enough to grant Muruch an exclusive mp3 download of “Bloodroot”. If you like what you hear, please support this talented independent artist by purchasing the full album at Bandcamp.

Sonya Cotton – Bloodroot (mp3)*

*posted for limited time w/ artist’s permission

Buy @ Bandcamp

Amanda Palmer & Jason Webley: New Album “Sketches for the Musical JIB”

Read all about it at Amanda’s website and hear/buy it at Bandcamp.

As old Muruch readers know well, I’ve been a fan of The Dresden Dolls, Amanda Palmer, and Jason Webley for over a decade. This album, particularly tracks “The Box,” “The Wolf,” and “The Fear Song,” shows how greatly they’ve grown as singer-songwriters over the years and especially in what I’m starting to think of as Amanda’s post-Machete era – Machete, the Bowie & Prince tributes, the Dolls reunion concert, and now this album. She’s no longer the former Dresden Dolls frontwoman or the controversial social media star, she’s Amanda Palmer, one of the most accomplished, talented singer-songwriters of my generation.