Current Read: The High Divide by Lin Enger

I loved Undiscovered Country, Lin Enger’s brilliant, modernized retelling of Hamlet, so I’m excited to begin reading his new novel, The High Divide. Enger again revamps a classic tale into a gritty Western story, this time with a post-Civil War version of The Odyssey.


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Music, Shakespeare, Books, Art & Nature at Festivall This Weekend!

West Virginians have an exciting weekend of arts-related events this weekend thanks to Charleston’s Festivall. We at Muruch will happily attend the following:

Friday, 7pm: Hamlet by The American Shakespeare Co.
The Scottish Rites Center, Capitol Street
Tickets: $20 adults, $15 seniors, $10 students.
Buy tickets in advance at Taylor Books or at the door

Friday & Saturday, 7:30pm: Romeo & Juliet by The Charleston Ballet
The Civic Center Little Theater
Tickets: Adults $20 in advance, $25 at door; students $15 in advance, $20 at door.Group rates also available.
Buy tickets online, Civic Ctr box office or at the door

Saturday, 8am-5pm: Library Used Book Sale
The Civic Center Little Theater
Free Admittance, books 50ยข-$2

Sunday, 1-4pm: Nature Walk w/ Live Music & Art
Sunrise Carriage Trail
Free!

Sunday, 7pm: Kate Miller-Heidke, Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn, Janiva Magness & Storyman at Mountain Stage
Culture Center Theater
Tickets: $15 advance, $20 at the door
Buy tickets online, at Taylor Books or at door


Katie Ford: Blood Lyrics (Poetry)

Katie Ford’s upcoming poetry collection, Blood Lyrics, possesses an authentic fierceness of emotion coupled with a literary eloquence that is all too rare in modern poetry. Blood Lyrics will be released by Gray Wolf Press on October 21st.

[ O where has our meadow gone?
that which swept us here?
the orange cosmos and aster?
the hollycock and pollen-fire?
So I sing of hell
and the brutal body. ]

As the gut-wrenching final line of her opening poem “Spell” testifies, these poems were born along with Ford’s fragile premature baby daughter. It is that intense mix of maternal love and fear of loss that drives these poetic words.

I’m incapable of writing an unbiased review since the subject of Ford’s writing hits close to home with my family, but I think the emotional power and sheer beauty of her phrasing would be just as impressive without a kindred experience.

To Read of Slaughter,” for example, adroitly describes in succinct perfection the eerie, telling force of “silence” as representative of an absence — the sober realization of having been left behind in the wake of another’s leavetaking.

Ford expertly examines the “Trivial” aspects of daily life in the shadow, or “horror show,” of a loved one’s suffering and potential death. She also expresses the cruelty of dread at a time when “there should have been delight, delight and windchimes, delight.”

Less compelling to me were the more universal themes presented in the book’s second section, “The Long War.” Ford remains adept at her craft, but I personally feel those middle poems lack the punch of sincerity felt in the first section, “Bloodline.”

Thankfully, the final poem, “From the Nursery,” gracefully ties the two seemingly contradictory threads of motherhood and war together. Blood Lyrics is a magnificent book, inside and out.

“Don’t say it’s the beautiful I praise. I praise the human, gutted and rising.”

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Serena Movie Trailer

I loved Ron Rash’s novel Serena, so I’m both excited and a little wary of the upcoming film adaption. I think Jennifer Lawrence was a good choice for the titular character and the new official trailer indicates the movie will stay true to the book’s gritty, rustic Depressiom-era setting…

Rainbow Rowell: Landline

Rainbow Rowell has quickly become one of my favorite authors. I enjoyed Rowell’s first two novels so much that, upon finishing Fangirl, I immediately dove headfirst into her spectacular third book, Landline.

Star-crossed lovers, love triangles, long distance phone calls, quirky time travel, marital problems, crazy relatives, happy endings, second chances and a plethora of pop culture references….Landline is a love story of Nora Ephron proportions.

Granted, this story of an old yellow rotary phone that literally connects a woman to her past is speckled with plotholes.

Nonetheless, it culls the best elements from classic romantic comedies like Sleepless in Seattle and time travel rom-coms like The Family Man, Big and 13 Going on 30. And it’s all wrapped up in Rowell’s distinctively endearing voice.

If ever a book needed to be made into a movie, it’s Landline.

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