“Fancy” cover by Neil Young (Jimmy Fallon) feat. Crosby, Stills & Nash

In case you missed it, Jimmy Fallon resurrected his Neil Young persona to cover Iggy Azalea’s “Fancy” with Crosby, Stills and Nash.

and here’s Fallon’s original Neil Young cover of Willow Smith’s “Whip My Hair” with Bruce Springsteen…

Ruth Moody: These Wilder Things

The Wailin’ Jennys is spawning some excellent solo albums. First Heather Masse, now Ruth Moody is set to release her sophomore solo album, These Wilder Things, on May 7th. Moody’s angelic, lilting soprano tangles with pop-polished bluegrass and folk. The new album also features guests Mark Knopfler, Jerry Douglas and Crooked Still’s Aoife O’Donovan.

The standout tracks are the old-fashioned, slightly eerie opener “Trouble and Woe” and the spectacular Mark Knopfler duet “Pockets.”

Other highlights include the beautiful title track ballad, “One and Only,” “Trees for Skies” and the exquisite, Celtic-influenced “Life is Long.”

The album also features a pretty, slowed and stripped down cover of Bruce Springsteen’s “Dancing in the Dark.” You can listen to the track, “One Light Shining,” in the following Soundcloud stream…

BUY @ AMAZON

Ruth Moody Official Site

Muruch’s Classic Albums Appreciation Club: Week 28

Last week’s pick, Bruce Springsteen’s Born to Run, is a classic in the truest sense of the word. Other than “Born to Run” – one of the greatest rock songs of all time, in my opinion – none of the tracks really stand out as individuals, but flow smoothly together as a cohesive whole. There’s a reason so many young artists and bands aspire to sound like Springsteen, the same reason he’s called The Boss, because he has always recorded the most authentic and brilliant of rock songs. Now for some ear candy…

This week’s classic album is…Van Halen: 1984.

To recap the procedure here: At the beginning of each week, I’ll post brief thoughts on the previous week’s listening experience along with the coming week’s classic album selection. Then sometime in the week that follows, we’ll all take the time to listen to the album from beginning to end with no distractions. It can be as simple as just getting away from the computer to listen alone or you can make an event of it with candles, beverages and friends. Whatever format you play the album in or the manner in which you listen, just give the music your full and undivided attention.

Feel free to comment or email your opinions of our selections and recommendations for classic albums (from any decade, including this one).

Muruch’s Classic Albums Appreciation Club: Week 27

Last week’s selection, Rufus Wainwright: Poses, is so good I wrote a proper review of it rather than my usual classic album “listening experience” blurb. You can read the album review by clicking here.

Poses will be included in its entirety in the forthcoming 19-disc House of Rufus boxset – set for release by Universal Music on July 20th. I hope to have my review of the boxset complete before the release date, but it’s a deliciously, ridiculously large amount of music to make my way through. Until then…

This week’s classic album is…Bruce Springsteen: Born to Run.

To recap the procedure here: At the beginning of each week, I’ll post brief thoughts on the previous week’s listening experience along with the coming week’s classic album selection. Then sometime in the week that follows, we’ll all take the time to listen to the album from beginning to end with no distractions. It can be as simple as just getting away from the computer to listen alone or you can make an event of it with candles, beverages and friends. Whatever format you play the album in or the manner in which you listen, just give the music your full and undivided attention.

Feel free to comment or email your opinions of our selections and recommendations for classic albums (from any decade, including this one).

Bruce Springsteen: Magic

So I’m very late on this one, but hopefully it’s obvious by now that I don’t care about being first (or eightieth) on anything. I posted a link to the song “Radio Nowhere” last August, but I didn’t get to listen to the rest of Magic until now. Bruce Springsteen is still The Boss, no doubt about it. This new album has a smoother production than the rougher style usually associated with Springsteen, but there’s no hiding that he is the quintessentially genuine rock article (even when he’s singing folk songs). As always, the man sounds best with his E Street Band.


pour me a drink, Theresa, in one of those glasses you dust off
and I’ll watch the bones in your back like the Stations of the Cross

The grinding riffs and rhythm of the opener “Radio Nowhere” (which just won Grammys for Best Rock Song & Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance) have faint echoes of Blue Oyster Cult’s “Don’t Fear The Reaper”, as the lyrics decry the deplorable state of modern radio.

“You’ll Be Coming Down” paints a pop streak over the rock arrangement with splashes of brass and piano. Clarence Clemons’ saxophone also takes the spotlight on “Livin’ In The Future” – which has shades of “Hungry Heart” and “Brilliant Disguise” – while it’s the haunting harmonica that steals the show on “Gypsy Biker”.

The retro pop tune “Girls In Their Summer Clothes” is the most polished and radio friendly of Springsteen’s career since “Glory Days”. The dusty prose of “I’ll Work For Your Love” is the prime example of why we girls swoon over this poetic curmudgeon, and the lyrics of the quietly simple title track are ominously riveting.

I got a shiny saw blade, all I need’s a volunteer, I’ll cut you in half while you’re smiling ear to ear and the freedom that you sought’s driftin’ like a ghost amongst the trees, this is what will be, this is what will be

Bruce Springsteen Official Site

Buy the CD or Mp3s