#Poetry Wed: “In the Old Barn” by Enda Carty

where junk from another age
ropes and harness
hang on the walls
and rot in the damp
where the small windows broken
are boarded and nailed
where in the old dresser
farm medicine and syringes
lie in rusty biscuit tins:

that’s where I found him…

Read the rest of the poem at Rhino Poetry and/or listen to audio of Enda Carty reading the poem here.

#Poetry Wed: “Altitude” by Jessica Goodfellow

“Altitude” by Jessica Goodfellow

Rescuers did not find my uncle’s body.
But they found his axe at an icy altitude
impossible to navigate without one
…”

Read the rest of the poem at The Nashville Review

Jessica Goodfellow Official Site
@jessdragonfly on Twitter

World Poetry Day

‘Tis World Poetry, so here are some of my favorite poems…

“When You Are Old” by William Butler Yeats

When you are old and grey and full of sleep,
And nodding by the fire, take down this book,
And slowly read, and dream of the soft look
Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep;

How many loved your moments of glad grace,
And loved your beauty with love false or true,
But one man loved the pilgrim soul in you,
And loved the sorrows of your changing face;

And bending down beside the glowing bars,
Murmur, a little sadly, how Love fled
And paced upon the mountains overhead
And hid his face amid a crowd of stars.

“Alone” by Edgar Allan Poe

From childhood’s hour I have not been
As others were—I have not seen
As others saw—I could not bring
My passions from a common spring—
From the same source I have not taken
My sorrow—I could not awaken
My heart to joy at the same tone—
And all I lov’d—I lov’d alone—
Then—in my childhood—in the dawn
Of a most stormy life—was drawn
From ev’ry depth of good and ill
The mystery which binds me still—
From the torrent, or the fountain—
From the red cliff of the mountain—
From the sun that ’round me roll’d
In its autumn tint of gold—
From the lightning in the sky
As it pass’d me flying by—
From the thunder, and the storm—
And the cloud that took the form
(When the rest of Heaven was blue)
Of a demon in my view—

“She Walks in Beauty” by Lord Byron

She walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies;
And all that’s best of dark and bright
Meet in her aspect and her eyes:
Thus mellow’d to that tender light
Which heaven to gaudy day denies.

One shade the more, one ray the less,
Had half impair’d the nameless grace
Which waves in every raven tress,
Or softly lightens o’er her face;
Where thoughts serenely sweet express
How pure, how dear their dwelling-place.

And on that cheek, and o’er that brow,
So soft, so calm, yet eloquent,
The smiles that win, the tints that glow,
But tell of days in goodness spent,
A mind at peace with all below,
A heart whose love is innocent!

“I Go Back to May, 1937” by Sharon Olds

I see them standing at the formal gates of their colleges,
I see my father strolling out
under the ochre sandstone arch, the
red tiles glinting like bent
plates of blood behind his head, I
see my mother with a few light books at her hip
standing at the pillar made of tiny bricks,
the wrought-iron gate still open behind her, its
sword-tips aglow in the May air,
they are about to graduate, they are about to get married,
they are kids, they are dumb, all they know is they are
innocent, they would never hurt anybody.
I want to go up to them and say Stop,
don’t do it—she’s the wrong woman,
he’s the wrong man, you are going to do things
you cannot imagine you would ever do,
you are going to do bad things to children,
you are going to suffer in ways you have not heard of,
you are going to want to die. I want to go
up to them there in the late May sunlight and say it,
her hungry pretty face turning to me,
her pitiful beautiful untouched body,
his arrogant handsome face turning to me,
his pitiful beautiful untouched body,
but I don’t do it. I want to live. I
take them up like the male and female
paper dolls and bang them together
at the hips, like chips of flint, as if to
strike sparks from them, I say
Do what you are going to do, and I will tell about it.

Last Day to Get Muruch.com’s RAINN Benefit Album!

Muruch.com’s RAINN benefit album & fundraising campaign will end New Year’s Eve, so you only have 1 day left to donate $10 (or more) at directly to RAINN.org and receive this magnificent 25-mp3 album!

Muruch.com for RAINN features: Concrete Blonde’s Johnette Napolitano, Sandman author Neil Gaiman, The Dresden Dolls’ frontwoman and Art of Asking author Amanda Palmer, Man of Steel‘s Allison Crowe, Midlake, Flogging Molly, Poe, My Brightest Diamond, The Mynabirds, The Voice‘s Kat Robichaud, Nashville songwriter Trent Dabbs, Meursault, Elysian Fields, Pamela Means, Fisher, Catie Curtis, Anielle Reid, Heidi Saperstein, Hannah Fury and poets Crystal Good, Kevin Kantor, and Clementine von Radics.

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Kevin Kantor: Poem for RAINN

Kevin Kantor donated his extraordinary poem “People You May Know” to Muruch.com’s RAINN benefit album. The poem gives an emotional account of Facebook’s attempt to connect Kantor to his rapist and gives voice to male sexual assault victims who face a particular kind of shame and pressure to stay silent. You can hear the song below and get all 25 mp3s of the album by donating $10 (or more) directly to RAINN through Muruch’s RAINN.org fundraising page.



Video courtesy of Button Poetry

The album also features music and poetry by Concrete Blonde’s Johnette Napolitano, American Gods/Sandman author Neil Gaiman, The Dresden Dolls’ Amanda Palmer, The Voice‘s Kat Robichaud, Midlake, Flogging Molly, Poe, The Mynabirds, Allison Crowe, Crystal Good, Kevin Kantor and many more.

Donate to RAINN/Get the Album